Commit 0f91b409 authored by Tinderbox User's avatar Tinderbox User

regen master

parent 4c6df165
......@@ -1992,6 +1992,16 @@ category notify { null; };
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>
<p><span class="command"><strong>trust-anchor-telemetry</strong></span></p>
</td>
<td>
<p>
Logs trust-anchor-telemetry requests received by named.
</p>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td>
<p><span class="command"><strong>unmatched</strong></span></p>
</td>
......@@ -4097,7 +4107,7 @@ options {
<dt><span class="term"><span class="command"><strong>host-statistics</strong></span></span></dt>
<dd>
<p>
In BIND 8, this enables keeping of
In BIND 8, this enabled keeping of
statistics for every host that the name server interacts
with.
Not implemented in BIND 9.
......@@ -6527,128 +6537,71 @@ avoid-v6-udp-ports { 40000; range 50000 60000; };
</p>
</div>
</dd>
<dt><span class="term"><span class="command"><strong>topology</strong></span></span></dt>
<dd>
<p>
In BIND 8, this option indicated network topology
so that preferential treatment could be given to
the topologicaly closest name servers when sending
queries. It is not implemented in BIND 9.
</p>
</dd>
</dl></div>
</div>
<div class="section">
<div class="titlepage"><div><div><h4 class="title">
<a name="topology"></a>Topology</h4></div></div></div>
<p>
All other things being equal, when the server chooses a name
server
to query from a list of name servers, it prefers the one that is
topologically closest to itself. The <span class="command"><strong>topology</strong></span> statement
takes an <span class="command"><strong>address_match_list</strong></span> and
interprets it
in a special way. Each top-level list element is assigned a
distance.
Non-negated elements get a distance based on their position in the
list, where the closer the match is to the start of the list, the
shorter the distance is between it and the server. A negated match
will be assigned the maximum distance from the server. If there
is no match, the address will get a distance which is further than
any non-negated list element, and closer than any negated element.
For example,
</p>
<pre class="programlisting">topology {
10/8;
!1.2.3/24;
{ 1.2/16; 3/8; };
};</pre>
<p>
will prefer servers on network 10 the most, followed by hosts
on network 1.2.0.0 (netmask 255.255.0.0) and network 3, with the
exception of hosts on network 1.2.3 (netmask 255.255.255.0), which
is preferred least of all.
</p>
<p>
The default topology is
</p>
<pre class="programlisting"> topology { localhost; localnets; };
</pre>
<div class="note" style="margin-left: 0.5in; margin-right: 0.5in;">
<h3 class="title">Note</h3>
<p>
The <span class="command"><strong>topology</strong></span> option
is not implemented in <acronym class="acronym">BIND</acronym> 9.
</p>
</div>
</div>
<div class="section">
<div class="titlepage"><div><div><h4 class="title">
<a name="the_sortlist_statement"></a>The <span class="command"><strong>sortlist</strong></span> Statement</h4></div></div></div>
<p>
The response to a DNS query may consist of multiple resource
records (RRs) forming a resource record set (RRset).
The name server will normally return the
RRs within the RRset in an indeterminate order
(but see the <span class="command"><strong>rrset-order</strong></span>
statement in <a class="xref" href="Bv9ARM.ch06.html#rrset_ordering" title="RRset Ordering">the section called &#8220;RRset Ordering&#8221;</a>).
The client resolver code should rearrange the RRs as appropriate,
that is, using any addresses on the local net in preference to
other addresses.
However, not all resolvers can do this or are correctly
configured.
When a client is using a local server, the sorting can be performed
in the server, based on the client's address. This only requires
configuring the name servers, not all the clients.
</p>
<p>
The <span class="command"><strong>sortlist</strong></span> statement (see below)
takes
an <span class="command"><strong>address_match_list</strong></span> and
interprets it even
more specifically than the <span class="command"><strong>topology</strong></span>
statement
does (<a class="xref" href="Bv9ARM.ch06.html#topology" title="Topology">the section called &#8220;Topology&#8221;</a>).
Each top level statement in the <span class="command"><strong>sortlist</strong></span> must
itself be an explicit <span class="command"><strong>address_match_list</strong></span> with
one or two elements. The first element (which may be an IP
address,
an IP prefix, an ACL name or a nested <span class="command"><strong>address_match_list</strong></span>)
of each top level list is checked against the source address of
records (RRs) forming a resource record set (RRset). The name
server will normally return the RRs within the RRset in an
indeterminate order (but see the <span class="command"><strong>rrset-order</strong></span>
statement in <a class="xref" href="Bv9ARM.ch06.html#rrset_ordering" title="RRset Ordering">the section called &#8220;RRset Ordering&#8221;</a>). The client
resolver code should rearrange the RRs as appropriate, that is,
using any addresses on the local net in preference to other
addresses. However, not all resolvers can do this or are
correctly configured. When a client is using a local server,
the sorting can be performed in the server, based on the
client's address. This only requires configuring the name
servers, not all the clients.
</p>
<p>
The <span class="command"><strong>sortlist</strong></span> statement (see below) takes an
<span class="command"><strong>address_match_list</strong></span> and interprets it in a
special way. Each top level statement in the
<span class="command"><strong>sortlist</strong></span> must itself be an explicit
<span class="command"><strong>address_match_list</strong></span> with one or two elements.
The first element (which may be an IP address, an IP prefix, an
ACL name or a nested <span class="command"><strong>address_match_list</strong></span>) of
each top level list is checked against the source address of
the query until a match is found.
</p>
<p>
Once the source address of the query has been matched, if
the top level statement contains only one element, the actual
primitive
element that matched the source address is used to select the
address
in the response to move to the beginning of the response. If the
statement is a list of two elements, then the second element is
treated the same as the <span class="command"><strong>address_match_list</strong></span> in
a <span class="command"><strong>topology</strong></span> statement. Each top
level element
is assigned a distance and the address in the response with the
minimum
distance is moved to the beginning of the response.
</p>
<p>
In the following example, any queries received from any of
the addresses of the host itself will get responses preferring
addresses
on any of the locally connected networks. Next most preferred are
addresses
on the 192.168.1/24 network, and after that either the
192.168.2/24
or
192.168.3/24 network with no preference shown between these two
networks. Queries received from a host on the 192.168.1/24 network
will prefer other addresses on that network to the 192.168.2/24
and
192.168.3/24 networks. Queries received from a host on the
192.168.4/24
or the 192.168.5/24 network will only prefer other addresses on
Once the source address of the query has been matched, if the
top level statement contains only one element, the actual
primitive element that matched the source address is used to
select the address in the response to move to the beginning of
the response. If the statement is a list of two elements, then
the second element is interpreted as a topology preference
list. Each top level element is assigned a distance and the
address in the response with the minimum distance is moved to
the beginning of the response.
</p>
<p>
In the following example, any queries received from any of the
addresses of the host itself will get responses preferring
addresses on any of the locally connected networks. Next most
preferred are addresses on the 192.168.1/24 network, and after
that either the 192.168.2/24 or 192.168.3/24 network with no
preference shown between these two networks. Queries received
from a host on the 192.168.1/24 network will prefer other
addresses on that network to the 192.168.2/24 and 192.168.3/24
networks. Queries received from a host on the 192.168.4/24 or
the 192.168.5/24 network will only prefer other addresses on
their directly connected networks.
</p>
......@@ -6678,15 +6631,13 @@ avoid-v6-udp-ports { 40000; range 50000 60000; };
<p>
The following example will give reasonable behavior for the
local host and hosts on directly connected networks. It is similar
to the behavior of the address sort in <acronym class="acronym">BIND</acronym> 4.9.x. Responses sent
to queries from the local host will favor any of the directly
connected
local host and hosts on directly connected networks. It is
similar to the behavior of the address sort in
<acronym class="acronym">BIND</acronym> 4.9.x. Responses sent to queries from
the local host will favor any of the directly connected
networks. Responses sent to queries from any other hosts on a
directly
connected network will prefer addresses on that same network.
Responses
to other queries will not be sorted.
directly connected network will prefer addresses on that same
network. Responses to other queries will not be sorted.
</p>
<pre class="programlisting">sortlist {
......@@ -10431,38 +10382,52 @@ example.com. NS ns2.example.net.
is present, it is a configuration error for the
<span class="command"><strong>allow-update</strong></span> statement to be
present. The <span class="command"><strong>update-policy</strong></span> statement
only examines the signer of a message; the source
(except when set to <code class="literal">local</code>) only
examines the signer of a message; the source
address is not relevant.
</p>
<p>
There is a pre-defined <span class="command"><strong>update-policy</strong></span>
rule which can be switched on with the command
A pre-defined <span class="command"><strong>update-policy</strong></span> rule can be
switched on with the command
<span class="command"><strong>update-policy local;</strong></span>.
Switching on this rule in a zone causes
<span class="command"><strong>named</strong></span> to generate a TSIG session
key and place it in a file, and to allow that key
to update the zone. (By default, the file is
<code class="filename">/var/run/named/session.key</code>, the key
name is "local-ddns" and the key algorithm is HMAC-SHA256,
but these values are configurable with the
<span class="command"><strong>named</strong></span> to generate a TSIG session key and
place it in a file. That key will then be allowed to update
the zone, if the update request is sent from localhost.
By default, the session key is stored in the file
<code class="filename">/var/run/named/session.key</code>; the key name
is "local-ddns" and the key algorithm is HMAC-SHA256.
These values are configurable with the
<span class="command"><strong>session-keyfile</strong></span>,
<span class="command"><strong>session-keyname</strong></span> and
<span class="command"><strong>session-keyalg</strong></span> options, respectively).
</p>
<p>
A client running on the local system, and with appropriate
permissions, may read that file and use the key to sign update
requests. The zone's update policy will be set to allow that
key to change any record within the zone. Assuming the
key name is "local-ddns", this policy is equivalent to:
A client on the local system, if it is run with appropriate
permissions, may read the session key from the key file and
use the key to sign update requests. The zone's update
policy will be set to allow that key to change any record
within the zone. Assuming the key name is "local-ddns",
this policy is:
</p>
<pre class="programlisting">update-policy { grant local-ddns zonesub any; };
</pre>
<p>
The command <span class="command"><strong>nsupdate -l</strong></span> sends update
requests to localhost, and signs them using the session key.
...with an additional restriction that only clients
connecting from the local system will be permitted to send
updates.
</p>
<p>
Note that only one session key is generated; all zones
configured to use <span class="command"><strong>update-policy local</strong></span>
will accept the same key.
</p>
<p>
The command <span class="command"><strong>nsupdate -l</strong></span> implements this
feature, sending requests to localhost and signing them using
the key retrieved from the session key file.
</p>
<p>
......@@ -12964,7 +12929,7 @@ HOST-127.EXAMPLE. MX 0 .
and not part of the standard zone file format.
</p>
<p>
BIND 8 does not support the optional TTL and CLASS fields.
BIND 8 did not support the optional TTL and CLASS fields.
</p>
</div>
......
......@@ -523,6 +523,15 @@
anchor is now a fatal configuration error. [RT #46155]
</p>
</li>
<li class="listitem">
<p>
Previously, <span class="command"><strong>update-policy local;</strong></span> accepted
updates from any source so long as they were signed by the
locally-generated session key. This has been further restricted;
updates are now only accepted from locally configured addresses.
[RT #45492]
</p>
</li>
<li class="listitem">
<p>
The lightweight resolver daemon and library (<span class="command"><strong>lwresd</strong></span>
......
......@@ -484,6 +484,15 @@
anchor is now a fatal configuration error. [RT #46155]
</p>
</li>
<li class="listitem">
<p>
Previously, <span class="command"><strong>update-policy local;</strong></span> accepted
updates from any source so long as they were signed by the
locally-generated session key. This has been further restricted;
updates are now only accepted from locally configured addresses.
[RT #45492]
</p>
</li>
<li class="listitem">
<p>
The lightweight resolver daemon and library (<span class="command"><strong>lwresd</strong></span>
......
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