Commit 7d8d76e1 authored by Mark Andrews's avatar Mark Andrews
Browse files

Will named be affected by the 2007 changes to daylight savings rules in the US.

parent 242818df
......@@ -635,7 +635,7 @@ A: Red Hat Security Enhanced Linux (SELinux) policy security protections :
(1), setsebool(8)
Q: I want to forward all DNS queries from my caching nameserver to another server.
But there are are some domains which have to be server locally, via rbldnsd.
But there are some domains which have to be served locally, via rbldnsd.
How do I achieve this ?
......@@ -655,4 +655,21 @@ A: options {
};
Q: Will named be affected by the 2007 changes to daylight savings rules in the US.
A: No, so long as the machines internal clock (as reported by "date -u") remains
at UTC. The only visible change if you fail to upgrade your OS, if you are in a
affected area, will be that log messages will be a hour out during the period
where the old rules do not match the new rules.
For most OS's this change just means that you need to update the conversion
rules from UTC to local time. Normally this involves updating a file in /etc
(which sets the default timezone for the machine) and possibly a directory
which has all the conversion rules for the world (e.g. /usr/share/zoneinfo).
When updating the OS do not forget to update any chroot areas as well. See your
OS's documetation for more details.
The local timezone conversion rules can also be done on a individual basis by
setting the TZ envirionment variable appropriately. See your OS's documentation
for more details.
......@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@
- PERFORMANCE OF THIS SOFTWARE.
-->
<!-- $Id: FAQ.xml,v 1.14 2006/11/30 05:59:41 marka Exp $ -->
<!-- $Id: FAQ.xml,v 1.15 2007/01/11 23:54:52 marka Exp $ -->
<article class="faq">
<title>Frequently Asked Questions about BIND 9</title>
......@@ -1239,5 +1239,38 @@ zone "list.dsbl.org" {
</programlisting>
</answer>
</qandaentry>
<qandaentry>
<question>
<para>
Will named be affected by the 2007 changes to daylight savings
rules in the US.
</para>
</question>
<answer>
<para>
No, so long as the machines internal clock (as reported
by "date -u") remains at UTC. The only visible change
if you fail to upgrade your OS, if you are in a affected
area, will be that log messages will be a hour out during
the period where the old rules do not match the new rules.
</para>
<para>
For most OS's this change just means that you need to
update the conversion rules from UTC to local time.
Normally this involves updating a file in /etc (which
sets the default timezone for the machine) and possibly
a directory which has all the conversion rules for the
world (e.g. /usr/share/zoneinfo). When updating the OS
do not forget to update any chroot areas as well.
See your OS's documetation for more details.
</para>
<para>
The local timezone conversion rules can also be done on
a individual basis by setting the TZ envirionment variable
appropriately. See your OS's documentation for more
details.
</para>
</answer>
</qandaentry>
</qandaset>
</article>
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