Commit 9b5c746e authored by Tomek Mrugalski's avatar Tomek Mrugalski 🛰
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[3109] Initial text import for Contributor's Guide

parent f164402c
// Copyright (C) 2013 Internet Systems Consortium, Inc. ("ISC")
//
// Permission to use, copy, modify, and/or distribute this software for any
// purpose with or without fee is hereby granted, provided that the above
// copyright notice and this permission notice appear in all copies.
//
// THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ISC DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES WITH
// REGARD TO THIS SOFTWARE INCLUDING ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY
// AND FITNESS. IN NO EVENT SHALL ISC BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, DIRECT,
// INDIRECT, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER RESULTING FROM
// LOSS OF USE, DATA OR PROFITS, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE
// OR OTHER TORTIOUS ACTION, ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE USE OR
// PERFORMANCE OF THIS SOFTWARE.
/**
@page contributorGuide BIND10 Contributor's Guide
So you found a bug in BIND10 or developed an extension and want to
send a patch? Great! This page will explain how to contribute your
changes and not get disappointed in the process.
Before you start working on a patch or new feature, it is a good idea
to discuss it first with BIND10 developers. You can post your
questions to bind10-dev
(https://lists.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/bind10-dev) for general BIND10
stuff or to bind10-dhcp
(https://lists.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/bind10-dhcp) for DHCP specific
topics. If you prefer to get faster feedback, most BIND10 developers
hang out at bind10 jabber room
(xmpp:bind10@conference.jabber.isc.org). Those involved in DHCP also
use dhcp chatroom (xmpp:dhcp@conference.jabber.isc.org). Feel free to
drop a note. It is possible that someone else is working on your
specific issue or perhaps the solution you plan to implement is not
the best one. Often having 10 minutes talk could save many hours of
engineering work.
Ok, so you have a patch? Great! Before you submit it, make sure that
your code compiles. This may seem obvious, but it there's more to
it. I'm sure you have checked that it compiles on your system, but
BIND10 is a portable software. Besides Linux, it is being compiled on
relatively uncommon systems, like OpenBSD or Solaris 11. Will your
code compile there? Will it work? What about endianess? It is likely
that you used regular x86, but the software is expected to run on many
other architectures.
Have your patch conforms to BIND10
http://bind10.isc.org/wiki/CodingGuidelines? You still can submit
a patch that does not adhere to it, but it will decrease your
chances of being accepted. If the deviations are minor, ISC engineer
that will do the review, will likely fix the issues. However,
if there are lots of them, reviewer may simply reject the patch
and ask you to fix it, before resubmitting.
One of the ground rules in BIND10 development is that every piece of
code has to be tested. We now have an extensive set of unit-tests for
almost every line of code. Even if you are fixing something small,
like a single line fix, it is encouraged to write unit-test for that
change. That is even more true for new code. If you write a new
function, method or a class, you definitely should write unit-tests
for it.
BIND10 uses google test (gtest) framework as a base for our
unit-tests. See http://code.google.com/p/googletest/ for details.
You must have gtest installed or at least compiled before compiling
BIND10 unit-tests. To enable unit-tests in BIND10
./configure --with-gtest=/path/to/your/gtest/dir
or
./configure --with-gtest-source=/path/to/your/gtest/dir
Depending on how you compiled or installed (e.g. from sources or using
some package management system) one of those two switches will find
gtest. After that you make run unit-tests:
make check
If you happen to add new files or modified Makefiles, it is also a
good idea to check if you haven't broken distribution process:
make distcheck
Once all those are checked and working, feel free to create a ticket
for your patch (http://bind10.isc.org) or attach your patch to the
existing ticket if there is one. You may drop a note to bind10 or dhcp
chatroom saying that you have submitted a patch. Alternatively, you
may send a note to bind10-dev or bind10-dhcp lists.
Here's the tricky part. One of BIND10 developers will review your
patch, but it may not happen immediately. Unfortunately, developers
are usually working under tight schedule, so any extra unplanned
review work sometimes make take a while. Having said that, we value
external contributions very much and will do whatever we can to
review patches in a timely manner. Don't get discouraged if your
patch is not accepted after first review. To keep the code quality
high, we use the same review processes for internal code and for
external patches. It may take several cycles of review/updated patch
submissions before the code is finally accepted.
Once the process is almost completed, the developer will likely ask
you how you would like to be credited. The typical answers are by
first,last name, by nickname, by company or anonymously. Typically we
will add a note to ChangeLog. If the contributted feature is big or
critical for whatever reason, it may be also mentioned in release
notes.
*/
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -33,6 +33,9 @@
* you should read <a href="http://bind10.isc.org/docs/bind10-guide.html">BIND10
* Guide (Administrator Reference for BIND10)</a> instead.
*
* @section contrib Contributor's Guide
* - @subpage contributorGuide
*
* Regardless of your field of expertise, you are encouraged to visit
* <a href="http://bind10.isc.org/">BIND10 webpage (http://bind10.isc.org)</a>
* @section hooksFramework Hooks Framework
......
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