Commit f08d444a authored by Shane Kerr's avatar Shane Kerr
Browse files

Language fixes for DHCP parts of guide.

parent bc24ccba
......@@ -1817,17 +1817,17 @@ then change those defaults with config set Resolver/forward_addresses[0]/address
clients. Even though principles of both DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 are
somewhat similar, these are two radically different
protocols. BIND10 offers server implementations for both DHCPv4
and DHCPv6. This chapter is about DHCP for IPv4. For description of
DHCPv6 server, see <xref linkend="dhcp6"/>.</para>
and DHCPv6. This chapter is about DHCP for IPv4. For a description
of the DHCPv6 server, see <xref linkend="dhcp6"/>.</para>
<para>DHCPv6 server component is currently under intense
<para>The DHCPv4 server component is currently under intense
development. You may want to check out <ulink
url="http://bind10.isc.org/wiki/Kea">BIND10 DHCP (Kea) wiki</ulink>
and recent posts on <ulink
url="https://lists.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/bind10-dev">BIND10
developers mailing list</ulink>.</para>
<para>DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 components in BIND10 architecture are
<para>The DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 components in BIND10 architecture are
internally code named <quote>Kea</quote>.</para>
<note>
......@@ -1835,7 +1835,7 @@ then change those defaults with config set Resolver/forward_addresses[0]/address
As of December 2011, both DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 components are
skeleton servers. That means that while they are capable of
performing DHCP configuration, they are not fully functional
yet. In particular, both do not have functional lease
yet. In particular, neither has functional lease
databases. This means that they will assign the same, fixed,
hardcoded addresses to any client that will ask. See <xref
linkend="dhcp4-limit"/> and <xref linkend="dhcp6-limit"/> for
......@@ -1845,7 +1845,7 @@ then change those defaults with config set Resolver/forward_addresses[0]/address
<section id="dhcp4-usage">
<title>DHCPv4 Server Usage</title>
<para>BIND10 provides DHCPv4 server component since December
<para>BIND10 provides the DHCPv4 server component since December
2011. It is a skeleton server and can be described as an early
prototype that is not fully functional yet. It is mature enough
to conduct first tests in lab environment, but it has
......@@ -1854,9 +1854,9 @@ then change those defaults with config set Resolver/forward_addresses[0]/address
</para>
<para>
DHCPv4 server is implemented as <command>b10-dhcp4</command>
The DHCPv4 server is implemented as <command>b10-dhcp4</command>
daemon. As it is not configurable yet, it is fully autonomous,
i.e. it does not interact with <command>b10-cfgmgr</command>.
that is it does not interact with <command>b10-cfgmgr</command>.
To start DHCPv4 server, simply input:
<screen>
......@@ -1869,16 +1869,16 @@ then change those defaults with config set Resolver/forward_addresses[0]/address
directory, in /usr/local/bin/b10-dhcp4 or other directory
you specified during compilation.
After start, server will detect available network interfaces
At start, the server will detect available network interfaces
and will attempt to open UDP sockets on all interfaces that
are up, running, are not loopback and have IPv4 address
are up, running, are not loopback, and have IPv4 address
assigned.
Server will then listen to incoming traffic. Currently
supported client messages are DISCOVER and REQUEST. Server
The server will then listen to incoming traffic. Currently
supported client messages are DISCOVER and REQUEST. The server
will respond to them with OFFER and ACK, respectively.
As DHCPv4 server opens privileged ports, it requires root
Since the DHCPv4 server opens privileged ports, it requires root
access. Make sure you run this daemon as root.</para>
<note>
......@@ -1896,13 +1896,13 @@ then change those defaults with config set Resolver/forward_addresses[0]/address
<section id="dhcp4-config">
<title>DHCPv4 Server Configuration</title>
<para>
DHCPv4 server does not have lease database implemented yet
or any support for configuration, so every time the same set
The DHCPv4 server does not have a lease database implemented yet
nor any support for configuration, so every time the same set
of configuration options (including the same fixed address)
will be assigned every time.
</para>
<para>
At this stage of development, the only way to alter server
At this stage of development, the only way to alter the server
configuration is to tweak its source code. To do so, please
edit src/bin/dhcp4/dhcp4_srv.cc file and modify following
parameters and recompile:
......@@ -1939,18 +1939,19 @@ const std::string HARDCODED_SERVER_ID = "192.0.2.1";</screen>
<section id="dhcp4-limit">
<title>DHCPv4 Server Limitations</title>
<para> These are the current limitations of DHCPv4 server
<para>These are the current limitations of the DHCPv4 server
software. Most of them are reflections of the early stage of
development and should be treated as <quote>not implemented
yet</quote>, rather than actual limitations.</para>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<simpara>During initial IPv4 node configuration, server is
expected to send packets to a node that does not have IPv4
address assigned yet. Server requires certain tricks (or
hacks) to transmit such packets. This is not implemented
yet, therefore DHCPv4 server supports relayed traffic only
(that is normal point to point communication).</simpara>
<simpara>During initial IPv4 node configuration, the
server is expected to send packets to a node that does not
have IPv4 address assigned yet. The server requires
certain tricks (or hacks) to transmit such packets. This
is not implemented yet, therefore DHCPv4 server supports
relayed traffic only (that is, normal point to point
communication).</simpara>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<simpara><command>b10-dhcp4</command> provides a single,
......@@ -1967,7 +1968,7 @@ const std::string HARDCODED_SERVER_ID = "192.0.2.1";</screen>
linkend="dhcp4-config"/> for details.</simpara>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<simpara>Upon start, server will open sockets on all
<simpara>Upon start, the server will open sockets on all
interfaces that are not loopback, are up and running and
have IPv4 address. Support for multiple interfaces is not
coded in reception routines yet, so if you are running
......@@ -2009,7 +2010,7 @@ const std::string HARDCODED_SERVER_ID = "192.0.2.1";</screen>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<simpara>-v (verbose) command line option is currently
permanently enabled.</simpara>
the default, and cannot be disabled.</simpara>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</section>
......@@ -2020,18 +2021,18 @@ const std::string HARDCODED_SERVER_ID = "192.0.2.1";</screen>
<title>DHCPv6 Server</title>
<para>Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for IPv6 (DHCPv6) is
specified in RFC3315. BIND10 provides DHCPv6 server implementation
that is described in this chapter. For DHCPv4 server
implementation, see <xref linkend="dhcp4"/>.
that is described in this chapter. For a description of the DHCPv4
server implementation, see <xref linkend="dhcp4"/>.
</para>
<para>DHCPv6 server component is currently under intense
<para>The DHCPv6 server component is currently under intense
development. You may want to check out <ulink
url="http://bind10.isc.org/wiki/Kea">BIND10 DHCP (Kea) wiki</ulink>
and recent posts on <ulink
url="https://lists.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/bind10-dev">BIND10
developers mailing list</ulink>.</para>
<para>DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 components in BIND10 architecture are
<para>The DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 components in BIND10 architecture are
internally code named <quote>Kea</quote>.</para>
<note>
......@@ -2039,7 +2040,7 @@ const std::string HARDCODED_SERVER_ID = "192.0.2.1";</screen>
As of December 2011, both DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 components are
skeleton servers. That means that while they are capable of
performing DHCP configuration, they are not fully functional
yet. In particular, both do not have functional lease
yet. In particular, neither has functional lease
databases. This means that they will assign the same, fixed,
hardcoded addresses to any client that will ask. See <xref
linkend="dhcp4-limit"/> and <xref linkend="dhcp6-limit"/> for
......@@ -2050,7 +2051,7 @@ const std::string HARDCODED_SERVER_ID = "192.0.2.1";</screen>
<section id="dhcp6-usage">
<title>DHCPv6 Server Usage</title>
<para>
BIND10 provides DHCPv6 server component since September
BIND10 provides the DHCPv6 server component since September
2011. It is a skeleton server and can be described as an early
prototype that is not fully functional yet. It is mature
enough to conduct first tests in lab environment, but it has
......@@ -2059,9 +2060,9 @@ const std::string HARDCODED_SERVER_ID = "192.0.2.1";</screen>
</para>
<para>
DHCPv6 server is implemented as <command>b10-dhcp6</command>
The DHCPv6 server is implemented as <command>b10-dhcp6</command>
daemon. As it is not configurable yet, it is fully autonomous,
i.e. it does not interact with <command>b10-cfgmgr</command>.
that is it does not interact with <command>b10-cfgmgr</command>.
To start DHCPv6 server, simply input:
<screen>
......@@ -2074,16 +2075,16 @@ const std::string HARDCODED_SERVER_ID = "192.0.2.1";</screen>
directory, in /usr/local/bin/b10-dhcp6 or other directory
you specified during compilation.
After start, server will detect available network interfaces
At start, server will detect available network interfaces
and will attempt to open UDP sockets on all interfaces that
are up, running, are not loopback, are multicast-capable and
are up, running, are not loopback, are multicast-capable, and
have IPv6 address assigned.
Server will then listen to incoming traffic. Currently
supported client messages are SOLICIT and REQUEST. Server
The server will then listen to incoming traffic. Currently
supported client messages are SOLICIT and REQUEST. The server
will respond to them with ADVERTISE and REPLY, respectively.
As DHCPv6 server opens privileged ports, it requires root
Since the DHCPv6 server opens privileged ports, it requires root
access. Make sure you run this daemon as root.
</para>
......@@ -2102,7 +2103,7 @@ const std::string HARDCODED_SERVER_ID = "192.0.2.1";</screen>
<section id="dhcp6-config">
<title>DHCPv6 Server Configuration</title>
<para>
DHCPv4 server does not have lease database implemented yet
The DHCPv6 server does not have lease database implemented yet
or any support for configuration, so every time the same set
of configuration options (including the same fixed address)
will be assigned every time.
......@@ -2143,7 +2144,7 @@ const std::string HARDCODED_DNS_SERVER = "2001:db8:1::1";</screen>
<section id="dhcp6-limit">
<title>DHCPv6 Server Limitations</title>
<para> These are the current limitations of DHCPv6 server
<para> These are the current limitations of the DHCPv6 server
software. Most of them are reflections of the early stage of
development and should be treated as <quote>not implemented
yet</quote>, rather than actual limitations.</para>
......@@ -2166,7 +2167,7 @@ const std::string HARDCODED_DNS_SERVER = "2001:db8:1::1";</screen>
linkend="dhcp6-config"/> for details.</simpara>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<simpara>Upon start, server will open sockets on all
<simpara>Upon start, the server will open sockets on all
interfaces that are not loopback, are up, running and are
multicast capable and have IPv6 address. Support for
multiple interfaces is not coded in reception routines yet,
......@@ -2200,8 +2201,8 @@ const std::string HARDCODED_DNS_SERVER = "2001:db8:1::1";</screen>
only. See <xref linkend="iface-detect"/> for details.</simpara>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<simpara>-v (verbose) command line option is currently permanently
enabled.</simpara>
<simpara>-v (verbose) command line option is currently the
default, and cannot be disabled.</simpara>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</para>
......@@ -2232,15 +2233,15 @@ const std::string HARDCODED_DNS_SERVER = "2001:db8:1::1";</screen>
interface detection routines. Interface detection is
currently only supported on Linux systems.</para>
<para>For non-linux systems, there is currently stub
<para>For non-Linux systems, there is currently stub
implementation provided. As DHCP servers need to know available
addresses, there is a simple mechanism implemented to provide
that information. User is expected to create interfaces.txt
file. Format of this file is simple. It contains list of
interfaces along with available address on each interface. This
mechanism is temporary and is going to be removed as soon as
interface detection becomes available on non-linux
systems. Example of interfaces.txt file looks as follows:
interface detection becomes available on non-Linux
systems. Here is an example of the interfaces.txt file:
<screen>
# For DHCPv6, please specify link-local address (starts with fe80::)
# If in doubt, check output of 'ifconfig -a' command.
......
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