Commit bcdb6c33 authored by Stephen Morris's avatar Stephen Morris
Browse files

[3396] Small changes to .dox files made during review

parent 8aeb0528
......@@ -26,12 +26,14 @@ Before you start working on a patch or a new feature, it is a good
idea to discuss it first with Kea developers. You can post your
questions to the \c kea-dev mailing list
(https://lists.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/kea-dev) or kea-users
(https://lists.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/kea-users). Kea-users list
is intended for users who are not interested in the internal working
or development details. It is ok to ask for feedback regarding new
(https://lists.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/kea-users). The kea-users list
is intended for users who are not interested in the internal workings
or development details of Kea: it is OK to ask for feedback regarding new
design or the best proposed solution to a certain problem, but all
the internal details should be limited to kea-dev and not posted
on kea-users. If you prefer to get
the internal details should be discussed on kea-dev and not posted
to kea-users.
If you prefer to get
faster feedback, most Kea developers hang out in the \c dhcp
jabber room (xmpp:dhcp@conference.jabber.isc.org). Feel free to join this
room and talk to us. It is possible that someone else is working on your
......@@ -39,17 +41,17 @@ specific issue or perhaps the solution you plan to implement is not
the best one. Often having a 10 minute talk could save many hours of
engineering work.
First step would be to get the source code from our Git repository. The
procedure is very easy and is explained here:
http://kea.isc.org/wiki/GitGuidelines. While it is possible to
provide a patch against the latest stable release, it makes the review
process much easier if it is for latest code from the Git \c master
branch.
The first step in writing the patch or new feature should be to get
the source code from our Git repository. The procedure is very easy and
is explained here: http://kea.isc.org/wiki/GitGuidelines. While it is
possible to provide a patch against the latest stable release, it makes
the review process much easier if it is for latest code from the Git \c
master branch.
Ok, so you have written a patch? Great! Before you submit it, make sure
OK, so you have written a patch? Great! Before you submit it, make sure
that your code compiles. This may seem obvious, but there's more to
it. You have surely checked that it compiles on your system, but Kea
is a portable software. Besides Linux, it is compiled and used on
is portable software. Besides Linux, it is compiled and used on
relatively uncommon systems like OpenBSD and Solaris 11. Will your code
compile and work there? What about endianess? It is likely that you used
a regular x86 architecture machine to write your patch, but the software
......@@ -59,8 +61,8 @@ For a complete list of systems we build on, you may take a look at the
following build farm report: http://git.kea.isc.org/~tester/builder/KEA-builder-new.html .
Does your patch conform to Kea coding guidelines
(http://kea.isc.org/wiki/CodingGuidelines)? You still can submit a
patch that does not adhere to it, but that will decrease its chances of
(http://kea.isc.org/wiki/CodingGuidelines)? You can submit a
patch that does not adhere to them, but that will reduce its chances of
being accepted. If the deviations are minor, the Kea engineer who
does the review will likely fix the issues. However, if there are lots
of issues, the reviewer may simply reject the patch and ask you to fix
......@@ -71,8 +73,8 @@ it before re-submitting.
One of the ground rules in Kea development is that every piece of
code has to be tested. We now have an extensive set of unit-tests for
almost every line of code. Even if you are fixing something small,
like a single line fix, it is encouraged to write unit-tests for that
change. That is even more true for new code. If you write a new
like a single line fix, you are encouraged to write unit-tests for that
change. That is even more true for new code: if you write a new
function, method or a class, you definitely should write unit-tests
for it.
......@@ -118,11 +120,11 @@ checks on logger parameters. Use \c --enable-debug to enable various
additional consistency checks that reduce performance but help during
development. If you happen to modify anything in the
documentation, use \c --enable-generate-docs. If you are modifying DHCP
code, you are likely to be interested in enabling the MySQL backend for
DHCP. Note that if the backend is not enabled, MySQL specific unit-tests
are skipped. From that perspective, it is useful to use
\c --with-dhcp-mysql. For PostgreSQL, use \c --with-dhcp-pgsql. For a
complete list of all switches, use:
code, you are likely to be interested in enabling a database backend for
DHCP. Note that if the backend is not enabled, the database-specific unit-tests
are skipped. To enable the MySQL backend, use the switch
\c --with-dhcp-mysql; for PostgreSQL, use \c --with-dhcp-pgsql.
A complete list of all switches can be obtained with the command:
@code
./configure --help
......@@ -130,7 +132,7 @@ complete list of all switches, use:
@section contributorGuideReview Going through a review
Once all those are checked and working, feel free to create a ticket for
Once everything is checked and working, feel free to create a ticket for
your patch at http://kea.isc.org/ or attach your patch to an existing
ticket if you have fixed it. It would be nice if you also join the
\c dhcp chatroom saying that you have submitted a patch. Alternatively,
......@@ -143,12 +145,12 @@ take a while sometimes. Having said that, we value external
contributions very much and will do whatever we can to review patches in
a timely manner. Don't get discouraged if your patch is not accepted
after first review. To keep the code quality high, we use the same
review processes for internal code and for external patches. It may take
review processes for external patches as we do for internal code. It may take
some cycles of review/updated patch submissions before the code is
finally accepted. The nature of the review process is that it emphasizes
areas that need improvement. If you are not used to the review process,
you may get the impression that the feedback is negative. It is not. We
seldom see reviews that say "all ok, please merge".
you may get the impression that the feedback is negative. It is not: even
the Kea developers seldom see reviews that say "All OK please merge".
Once the process is almost complete, the developer will likely ask you
how you would like to be credited. The typical answers are by first and
......@@ -163,7 +165,7 @@ If you are interested in knowing the results of more in-depth testing,
you are welcome to visit the Kea build farm:
http://git.kea.isc.org/~tester/builder/KEA-builder-new.html. This is a
live result page with all tests being run on various systems. Besides
basic unit-tests, we also have reports from Valgrind (memory debugger),
basic unit-tests, we also have reports from valgrind (memory debugger),
cppcheck and clang-analyzer (static code analyzers), Lettuce system
tests and more. Although it is not possible for non ISC employees to run
tests on that farm, it is possible that your contributed patch will end
......
......@@ -43,7 +43,7 @@ Configuration Manager (\ref isc::dhcp::CfgMgr) stores configuration information
necessary for DHCPv4 and DHCPv6 server operation. In particular, it stores
subnets (\ref isc::dhcp::Subnet4 and \ref isc::dhcp::Subnet6) together with
their pools (\ref isc::dhcp::Pool4 and \ref isc::dhcp::Pool6), options and
other information specified by the used in Kea configuration.
other information specified by the user in the Kea configuration.
@section allocengine Allocation Engine
......
......@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ The hooks framework is a Kea system that simplifies the way that
users can write code to modify the behavior of Kea. Instead of
altering the Kea source code, they write functions that are compiled
and linked into a shared library. The library is specified in the Kea
configuration and during run time Kea dynamically loads the library
configuration and at run time Kea dynamically loads the library
into its address space. At various points in the processing, the component
"calls out" to functions in the library, passing to them the data is it
currently working on. They can examine and modify the data as required.
......@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ during its execution, see the document @ref hooksdgDevelopersGuide.
In the remainder of this guide, the following terminology is used:
- Component - a Kea process, e.g. a DHCPv4 or DHCPv6 server.
- Component - a Kea process, e.g. the DHCPv4 or DHCPv6 server.
- Hook/Hook Point - used interchageably, this is a point in the code at
which a call to user-written functions is made. Each hook has a name and
......
......@@ -133,7 +133,7 @@ Although the hooks system allows Kea and user code to interface
through a defined API, the relationship is somewhat tight in that the
user code will depend on the internal structures of Kea. If these
change - as they can between Kea releases - and Kea is run with
a version of user code built against an earlier version of Kea, program
a version of user code built against an earlier version of Kea, a program
crash could result.
To guard against this, the "version" function must be provided in every
......
......@@ -285,8 +285,8 @@ a problem in a write operation.</li>
two or three words separated by underscores. An excessive number
of words or overly long message identification should be avoided;
such information should be put in the text of the message. For example,
"RESOLVER_ERROR_FETCHING_NAME_FROM_UPSTREAM_SERVER" is excessively long,
"RESOLVER_FETCH_ERROR" being better.</li>
"RECEIVED_EMPTY_HOSTNAME_FROM_CLIENT" is excessively long,
"EMPTY_HOSTNAME" being better.</li>
<li>Similarly, the text of the message should be reasonably concise. It should
include enough information (possibly supplied at run-time in the form of
......
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