Commit ce54ff20 authored by Jeremy C. Reed's avatar Jeremy C. Reed
Browse files

[trac1341] add some docbook formatting and fix spelling typo

(spell checks don't find misspellings that create other correct words :)
parent 8fe1dbda
......@@ -818,34 +818,45 @@ Debian and Ubuntu:
</para>
<para>
The kind specifies how a failure of the component should be handled.
If it is set to "dispensable" (the default unless you set something
else), it will get started again if it fails. If it is set to
"needed" and it fails at startup, the whole bind10 shuts down and exits
with error exit code. But if it fails some time later, it is just
started again. If you set it to "core", you indicate that the system
is not usable without the component and if such component fails, the
system shuts down no matter when the failure happened. This is the
behaviour of the core components (the ones you can't turn off), but
you can declare any other components as core as well if you wish
(but you can turn these off, they just can't fail).
The kind specifies how a failure of the component should
be handled. If it is set to <quote>dispensable</quote>
(the default unless you set something else), it will get
started again if it fails. If it is set to <quote>needed</quote>
and it fails at startup, the whole <command>bind10</command>
shuts down and exits with error exit code. But if it fails
some time later, it is just started again. If you set it
to <quote>core</quote>, you indicate that the system is
not usable without the component and if such component
fails, the system shuts down no matter when the failure
happened. This is the behaviour of the core components
(the ones you can't turn off), but you can declare any
other components as core as well if you wish (but you can
turn these off, they just can't fail).
</para>
<para>
The priority defines order in which the components should start.
The ones with higher number are started sooner than the ones with
lover ones. If you don't set it, 0 is used as the priority.
lower ones. If you don't set it, 0 (zero) is used as the priority.
</para>
<para>
There are other parameters we didn't use in our example.
One of them is "address". It is the address used by the component
on the b10-msgq message bus. The special components already know
their address, but the usual ones don't. The address is by convention
the thing after b10-, with the first letter capital (eg. b10-stats
would have Stats as its address).
One of them is <quote>address</quote>. It is the address
used by the component on the <command>b10-msgq</command>
message bus. The special components already know their
address, but the usual ones don't. The address is by
convention the thing after <emphasis>b10-</emphasis>, with
the first letter capital (eg. <command>b10-stats</command>
would have <quote>Stats</quote> as its address).
<!-- TODO: this should be simplified so we don't even have to document it -->
</para>
<!-- TODO: what does "The special components already know their
address, but the usual ones don't." mean? -->
<!-- TODO: document params when is enabled -->
<para>
The last one is process. It is the name of the process to be started.
It defaults to the name of the component if not set, but you can use
......@@ -866,12 +877,18 @@ Debian and Ubuntu:
<note>
<para>
The configuration is quite powerful, but that includes a lot of space
for mistakes. You could turn off the b10-cmdctl, but then you
couldn't change it back the usual way, as it would require it to be
running (you would have to find and edit the configuration directly).
Also, some modules might have dependencies -- b10-stats-http need
b10-stats, b10-xfrout needs the b10-auth to be running, etc.
The configuration is quite powerful, but that includes
a lot of space for mistakes. You could turn off the
<command>b10-cmdctl</command>, but then you couldn't
change it back the usual way, as it would require it to
be running (you would have to find and edit the configuration
directly). Also, some modules might have dependencies
-- <command>b10-stats-httpd</command> need
<command>b10-stats</command>, <command>b10-xfrout</command>
needs the <command>b10-auth</command> to be running, etc.
<!-- TODO: should we define dependencies? -->
</para>
<para>
In short, you should think twice before disabling something here.
......@@ -879,16 +896,19 @@ Debian and Ubuntu:
</note>
<para>
Now, to the mysterious setuid virtual component. If you use the <command>-u</command>
option to start the bind10 as root, but change the user later, we need
to start the <command>b10-auth</command> or <command>b10-resolver</command>
as root (until the socket creator is finished). So we need to specify
the time when the switch from root do the given user happens and that's
what the setuid component is for. The switch is done at the time the
setuid component would be started, if it was a process. The default
configuration contains the setuid component with priority 5, b10-auth
has 10 to be started before the switch and everything else is without
priority, so it is started after the switch.
Now, to the mysterious setuid virtual component. If you
use the <command>-u</command> option to start the
<command>bind10</command> as root, but change the user
later, we need to start the <command>b10-auth</command> or
<command>b10-resolver</command> as root (until the socket
creator is finished).<!-- TODO --> So we need to specify
the time when the switch from root do the given user happens
and that's what the setuid component is for. The switch is
done at the time the setuid component would be started, if
it was a process. The default configuration contains the
setuid component with priority 5, <command>b10-auth</command>
has 10 to be started before the switch and everything else
is without priority, so it is started after the switch.
</para>
</section>
......
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